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Children’s headshots, a complete guide for Parents

Children’s Headshots, a complete Guide for Parents

Anthony Farrimond

How can I get a great kid’s headshots for my child? I decided to create this guide, full of tips and advice because I get asked this question so often. For guidance on children’s headshots read on or jump to a section using the links below.

Over the last couple of years, you’ve seen your child grow. They’ve developed a passion for the performing arts, most likely through school and now they’re showing interest in learning new skills at specialist schools. Weekends and evenings are jam-packed with courses, classes, practising and it’s amazing to see how their creativity makes them so happy. But where is this all leading to? Pretty soon, if not already, they’ll be asked to audition for something with a professional production company. You’ll be asked to help them update their CV and get a professional headshot done. No matter their age or stage in their development, when it comes to working on a professional production whether that be a 2-minute commercial or as part of a chorus line on stage they’ll need to fulfil these basic requirements to be ‘seen’ I’ve put together everything you need to know about headshots into one useful guide with a hope that it helps you make the right choices when it comes to your child’s headshots. So exactly what is a headshot? It’s a lot of things, including but not limited to their look, acting type, playing age range and much more besides. Getting all of this info crammed into one single image can seem daunting, it can be but understanding what it is can make what is one of the most important photos of them, relatively easy to achieve. What’s the reward? Getting the headshot right can literally open doors and it works for you 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. I’ve no doubt raised several questions so before we muddy the water any further, let’s break it down and figure out exactly what goes into a winning headshot.

A headshot is often the first thing that is considered when submitting yourself to agents or for castings.

What do you need a headshot for?

Your child’s headshot isn’t just there to accompany their CV, it has so many uses. Perhaps you have a website, you most certainly will use it for their online casting profiles etc. And of course, you’ll submit it to agents in the hope for representation. Their face is literally their brand and their headshot illustrates that for all the world to see.

What do I mean when I say ‘brand’? A brand is something that people find immediately recognisable, Your child’s headshot represents what’s on offer, like a poster advertising a product, when someone meets them for the first time, they should already have an understanding of what to expect. Their headshot will help them do this. So like many big brands, it’s useful to use their headshot in as many places as possible, connecting any online profiles to their social media and so on.

What does a casting director want from a headshot?

Similar to a passport photo, a headshot should look like your child. When a casting director looks at their headshot they want to see that it actually looks like them but more than that, they want to get a sense of how they might fit the role they are casting for. They will go through hundreds of submissions making it incredibly important that their headshot stands out, that if they had met them previously, they will immediately recognise them.

Casting directors will have something very specific in mind so it’s incredibly important, especially early on in their career, to establish the type of roles they want to go for. Your headshot will, at least in part, represent that. Paired with the right casting, this increases your chances of being picked out from the crowd.

What else should you consider? A casting director should get an idea of their age range from their headshot, their socioeconomic background (working class, upper class etc), an idea of their looks, what role(s) they would be best suited to and of course some indication of their personality.

When a casting director looks at their headshot they want to see that it actually looks like you but more than that, they want to get a sense of how you might fit the role they are casting for.

What makes a good headshot?

A good headshot should give us an idea of who they are as an actor and potentially which roles they are best suited to. They are unique and their headshot should show that.

Your child’s headshot should look like them but on a good day. They say that you should never judge a book by its cover, that’s true, however in this case the cover should look the best it possibly can but does that mean having a full makeover and the resulting images be retouched almost beyond recognition, no, and we’ll talk about that a little later on.

We can’t deny that the physical aspects of a headshot will be considered but there is a great deal of importance in what lies underneath, a good headshot will give us an opportunity to see that too. If you’re not sure what that means or unsure as to who they, the actor, are then it’s probably time you sat down with them and write it down.  A great exercise is to sit down and write down your best qualities as an actor, your parts of your personality that you want to associate with what you do and then ask your friends to do the same for you. This is your list of things you need from your headshot. Depending on their age, this might not be entirely practical but you get the idea!

What makes a bad headshot?

Think about the absolute worst scenario, you submit your child’s headshot to a casting, get accepted, travel all the way down to London only to be turned away because they look nothing like their headshot. That is pretty much the main thing that makes a headshot ‘bad’.

It can go horribly wrong elsewhere too, logos, crazy fabrics, distracting jewellery, backgrounds that take over the photo (like trees growing out of the back of your head) and far too much make-up.

The last thing you want a casting director or prospective agent to be thinking is, “what is this person wearing?” or “who on earth took this photo?”. If they are thinking that, they aren’t thinking of casting you or putting them on their books.

Be prepared – what to know before getting your headshots taken.

You’ve invested both time and money into getting your child’s headshots done, it’s important that you should be clear on what you want to get from their headshot session.

Preparing for their headshots isn’t just about getting a haircut and getting plenty of sleep, it also requires a great deal of thought as well. What will you use your headshots for? Which type will they play? What do they aspire to?

You should be able to answer all of these questions already, take inspiration from the styles of shows they like on Netflix. If they seem to be drawn to one particular style you should ensure that their headshots fit that tone.

You should also be thinking about the types of roles they wish to play also. The clothing choices you make should complement the look and feel of those roles they aspire to.

Preparing for your headshots isn’t just about getting a haircut and getting plenty of sleep, it also requires a great deal of thought as well.

What questions should I ask a headshot photographer?

These are the best questions to ask a headshot photographer:

 

  • Do you have a portfolio of your past work?
  • What are your rates?
  • What is included in your rate?
  • Do you shoot indoor or outdoor?
  • How many looks does your session include?
  • How long is a session?
  • Do you recommend anyone for makeup, hair, retouching?

What can I expect from a headshot photoshoot?

Headshot photoshoots last at least one hour and can go up to three hours.

You should bring their wardrobe changes with you. If you’re shooting outdoors, wear comfortable shoes, especially if you will be walking to different locations—your feet won’t show up in the shot. Your photographer will shoot them from various different angles.

You should expect your photographer to sit them down and go through what you’ve discussed prior to the shoot. This should help keep things fresh and help you relax before the shooting begins!

How can they relax during their headshot session?

This is where having a great rapport with your photographer is really important.

Being able to engage easily with the person taking your photograph will help you relax. Some photographers will even direct you.

It can be overwhelming having built up how important getting this headshot right is, but that shouldn’t make you feel nervous. The key to a great headshot is being relaxed, have fun! Let their personality shine through.

How often should I get new headshots taken?

They should get new headshots taken every one or two years, every 6 months to one year for children.

Any time they change their look, they need new headshots. If they get a considerable haircut, dye it a different colour, or if they gain/lose a significant amount of weight, they should also get new headshots.

Are their current headshots benefiting or hurting their career. Are they getting positive feedback on them? Or are they getting called in less because their headshot doesn’t look like them?

How do I pick the right headshot?

To pick the right headshot, ask your family, friends and other actors, for advice.

Your photographer should send you a link to an online gallery of your images from their shoot. Ask people to take a look through the gallery and pick their favourites. Ask them to give you feedback on the styles or roles they come across as in them, how does this compare to that list you thought of prior to their shoot?

It can be a difficult thing, looking at row upon row of images but keep a clear mind and focus on the importance of this headshot and what it will do for them over the coming months.

Has this left you with more questions?

It’s a daunting thing arranging headshots and the compulsion is to go with the first person recommended. Apply the same process you would when making a significant purchase. A headshot isn’t a house or a car but done right is incredibly valuable. Get in touch if you have any questions at all or want to discuss this further!

Anthony is best known as a leading headshot and portrait photographer, working primarily with actors & businesses across the UK.

He’s a blogger, speaker, coach and advisor

Want some quick advice?

I regularly schedule calls to answer your questions, it all starts with a quick message from you.

What sets Anthony apart is that he really takes the time to understand exactly who you are as a performer, both by having a discussion before the shoot and constantly during the session.

Lucy Ivison

What should you expect from your actor’s headshot session

What You should expect from Your Actors Headshot Session

Anthony Farrimond

I know how hard you’re working. You’re ambitious and full of determination most days but then some days leave you full of doubt and resistance.

I’m pretty passionate about what I do too and as a creative, I’m on that rollercoaster with you. You know how brilliantly you do what you do and want the world to know that too. Your image is mega important to you and its got to be right.

You want a set of images that reflect you to a tee. You want them to show just how dynamic and fresh you are and you want them to help you stand head and shoulders above your competition because that’s exactly where you deserve to be.

I won’t pick up my camera until I’ve had a chance to get to know you and your career and what you want to project to the world. You can tell me all about it over the phone / video and we can geek out over theatre and films, and training for a bit. We’ll chat about ideas for your shoot and you don’t have to worry if you don’t have any cause you can bet I’ll have loads!

And as for feeling awkward and embarrassed in front of the camera… There won’t be time for that cause I pretty much never stop telling you exactly what to do and showing you exactly how to do it. You can have a good laugh at me showing you how to ‘work that shoulder’ (just wait till you learn that little trick!). You will be stunned and amazed at how much fun you and will have taking photographs. 

Anthony is best known as a leading headshot and portrait photographer, working primarily with actors & businesses across the UK.

He’s a blogger, speaker, coach and advisor

Want some quick advice?

I regularly schedule calls to answer your questions, it all starts with a quick message from you.

What sets Anthony apart is that he really takes the time to understand exactly who you are as a performer, both by having a discussion before the shoot and constantly during the session.

Lucy Ivison

6 Top Headshot tips that will improve your image

6 Top Headshot Tips that will Improve your Image

Anthony Farrimond

Over the years I have tried and tested numerous techniques and worked with hundreds of clients to achieve the look that was best for them, tailoring my coaching style to suit them however no matter the client, commission or type of lighting I use the following tips have remained a constant. Whether you are about to have your headshot taken or you are a photographer about to embark on one of your first sessions, hopefully, some if not all of these tips will help!

1. Give yourself a head start

You’ve planned for your headshot session, exchanging calls and email, you’ve arranged a date and a time but you need to make sure you give yourself the best possible chance for a great photo session.

Know what you need on the day, what you are going to wear, samples of previous headshots, for example, should all be ready in advance so you’re not rushing around.  Also, get to know you, get comfortable with your face and what you can do with it, practising expression technique in front of a mirror is especially useful.  Having your photograph taken in this way isn’t necessarily natural, so try to remove all the possible sources of stress to help relax you on the day.

Finally, the most important thing is you! Refrain from alcohol and start to drink plenty of water at least three days beforehand and get plenty of sleep the evening before.

 

2. Less is more

Your headshot should look like you on a good day. Although we all want to look our best for photographs, if we go to the effort that we may go-to for a special occasion, such as getting a new hair cut or a makeover, we will look nothing like our headshot when it comes to meeting the person it is meant for. The casting director, interview panel or new client may not recognise you when meeting them for the first time.

Men should be clean-shaven or neatly trimmed, check to see if there are facilities at the studio to shave to give you multiple looks. For women, light makeup as a concealer is acceptable, you can always add to your look once you are at your session. If you can wear your hair either up or down, bring some clips or scrunchies along on the day.

 

3. What to wear

Don’t try to overthink this, like everything else in preparation for your headshot session, keep it simple but remember to avoid certain things. Plain colours that complement your skin tone or hair are a safe bet, the stock black or white shirt, T-shirt, blouse or vest will suffice too.

In my headshot sessions, there is usually time to change at least three times so take a few options. Ladies should note that although varying necklines is a great advantage and I’d highly recommend bringing different style tops, you shouldn’t wear anything with a plunging neckline as it will prove to be more of a distraction than it will flattering!

Finally, if you are in despair and end up packing your entire wardrobe to your shoot, just leave out anything with a crazy pattern, recognisable logo or bright garish colour. Your photographer will help you choose what suits your images best on the day!

 

4. Explore your range

Although this tip is especially important for actors, it can be used for anyone posing for their photograph, just think about who your target audience is. Every casting you go to is different and to that end, you should explore your range during the shoot to give you even more variety to choose from.

An example of range could be having a fun, smiling portrait, great for commercial work and a serious, dramatic look for a theatrical role. Be honest in whatever you do, anything overly posed or too extreme won’t look genuine.

 

5. Choosing your headshot

You are your own worst critic so when choosing your images from the photo session it’s always a good idea to get other people’s opinion. Before you ask a relative or partner do be mindful, friends and family will naturally go for the big happy smiley photographs of you without considering what you will be using your images for. Ask others in the industry not partners or family members, other actors or your agent if you are an actor yourself, colleges or trusted clients if you are having some corporate images done.

Finally, try to see beyond the overall look of your proofs, that’s all they are – images straight out of the camera with no work done to them as yet. Final editing will correct any problems such as it being a little dark or light, retouching unexpected blemishes can be done too, I always ask my clients to point out minor things they’d like to remove but I always advise against removing things like laughter lines or wrinkles.

 

6. Preparing for web, print and email

Check with your photographer as to how you will be receiving your final images, the dimensions or resolution of each photograph will affect the size of the file. For example, you wouldn’t send a casting agent a high-resolution file on email, if it doesn’t fail to send it’ll block up their inbox – not the best first impression!

The resolution you’d use for email will be suitable for your social media accounts too but you should know that sites such as Twitter reduce the resolution of anything you upload significantly, so expect some loss in clarity.

If you are having your image printed, speak to your photographer, again checking the resolution and depending on where you are getting it printed its colour profile. Ideally, you should consider getting your photographer to arrange to print for you, they will have access to professional printers and will be able to provide you with a high-quality finish, much better than that off the high street. If you do decide to print with a high street store, you will most likely be asked to provide a limited print release; this is simply a signed statement from your photographer allowing you rights to reproduce the photographs.

That’s it! Hopefully you’ll find some if not all of the above useful, no matter the type of photo session you are about to have. If you’d like to know more or see what other people’s opinions are, why not join the conversation below!

Anthony is best known as a leading headshot and portrait photographer, working primarily with actors & businesses across the UK.

He’s a blogger, speaker, coach and advisor

Want some quick advice?

I regularly schedule calls to answer your questions, it all starts with a quick message from you.

Anthony is an extremely talented photographer, with lots of experience and knowledge.

Sam Rose

My secret recipe for the Perfect Headshot

My Secret Recipe for the Perfect Headshot

Anthony Farrimond

I believe everyone should have the best possible chance at creating a winning headshot, which is why I coach my clients from the moment we book, right through to the end of their session. The whole process starts with one simple statement that I ask everyone to answer before we start to plan our session.

“I would hire (me), if I were looking for (…)”

Unless you know the answer to that statement, how can you be sure it’s what you will project in your headshots? This is where my whole process starts and once you know what ‘type’ you are we add my recipe for a successful session.

1. Add a good helping of Honesty

Your expression should be real, so we start by finding your neutral point and do small variations around that. Expression should be effortless, trying too hard can come across fake, or overzealous neither are qualities of a professional actor that has the skills and experience to deliver a believable performance.

I like to keep backgrounds simple this is to reduce the look of it being too much like a photo shoot. This, together with how I use light during a session produces a look like a still taken whilst on set.

Finally retouching is light, removing anything temporary like spots, a nik from shaving or something that would be removed with make up whilst on set.

2. Fold your ingredients Effortlessly

Once you have a grasp of your natural expression we find a rhythm and make small changes, by the end of the session you’re doing this without thinking.

We try to capture your image as if you are on set (a production still). These shots are invariably captured whilst you are working and you don’t really think too much about it at the time. In these images you’re not trying too hard in front of the camera and so it looks natural and effortless.

It’s plausible that the image wasn’t taken from an actual headshot session. This is what we hope to achieve during the session.

3. Finish with a Personal touch

It’s very important that you bring something into the shot, something of you that we can identify with, this will be different for everyone.

Perhaps its your charm or wit, your fragility, gravitas or warmth.

There’s no room for bland, safe, neutral headshots in this industry. They should be something that makes you stand out, competitive and should always relate to my initial question – ‘I would hire (me) if I were looking for a (…)’.

Anthony is best known as a leading headshot and portrait photographer, working primarily with actors & businesses across the UK.

He’s a blogger, speaker, coach and advisor

Want some quick advice?

I regularly schedule calls to answer your questions, it all starts with a quick message from you.

Anthony gets to know you so that the shoot is tailored to your needs. I’d recommend him to anyone and will definitely be using him again in future.

Chris O'Donaghue

11 things you need to know about Actors Headshots

11 things you need to know about Actors Headshots

Anthony Farrimond

You’re just starting out or perhaps you’re revisiting your career as an actor, everything’s new and there seems to be a hundred things to do and a dozen ways to do it. Getting your headshots being one of those crucial things but where do you start? I’ve put together everything you need to know about actors headshots into one useful guide with a hope that it helps you make the right choices when it comes to your headshots.

So exactly what is a headshot? It’s a lot of things, including but not limited to your look, acting type, playing age range and much more besides. Getting all of this info crammed into one single image can seem daunting, it can be but understanding what it is can make what is one of the most important photos of yourself, relatively easy to achieve.

What’s the reward? Getting your headshot right can literally open doors and it works for you 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

I’ve no doubt raised several questions so before we muddy the water any further, let’s break it down and figure out exactly what goes into a winning actors headshot.

A headshot is often the first thing that is considered when submitting yourself to agents or for castings.

1. What do I need a headshot for?

Your headshot isn’t just there to accompany your CV, it has so many uses. Perhaps you have a website or business cards, you most certainly will use it for your online casting profiles, Twitter, Facebook and any other social media profiles you have. And of course, you’ll submit it to agents in the hope for representation. Your headshot is one of the most valuable tools in your actor’s tool belt. You face is literally your brand and your headshot illustrates that for all the world to see.

What do I mean when I say ‘brand’? A brand is something that people find immediately recognisable, your headshot represents what’s on offer, like a poster advertising a product, when someone meets you for the first time, they should already have an understanding of what to expect. Your headshot will help you do this. So like many big brands, it’s useful to use your headshot in as many places as possible, connecting your online profiles to your social media and so on.

A headshot is often the first thing that is considered when submitting yourself to agents or for castings.

2. What does a casting director want from a headshot?

Similar to a passport photo, a headshot should look like you. When a casting director looks at your headshot they want to see that it actually looks like you but more than that, they want to get a sense of how you might fit the role they are casting for. They will go through hundreds of submissions making it incredibly important that your headshot stands out, that if you had met them previously, they will immediately recognise you.

Casting directors will have something very specific in mind so it’s incredibly important, especially early on in your career, to establish the type of roles you want to go for. Your headshot will, at least in part, represent that. Paired to the right casting, this increases your chances of being picked out from the crowd.

What else should you consider? A casting director should get an idea of your age range from your headshot, your socioeconomic background (working class, upper class etc), an idea of your looks (attractiveness), what role(s) you would be best suited to (educated professional, someone in a position of authority, blue collar worker) and of course some indication of your personality.

When a casting director looks at your headshot they want to see that it actually looks like you but more than that, they want to get a sense of how you might fit the role they are casting for.

3. What makes a good headshot?

A good headshot should give us an idea of who you are as an actor and potentially which roles you are best suited to. You are unique and your headshot should show that.

Your headshot should look like you but on a good day. They say that you should never judge a book by its cover, that’s true however in this case the cover should look the best it possibly can but does that mean having a full makeover and the resulting images be retouched almost beyond recognition, no and we’ll talk about that a little later on.

We can’t deny that the physical aspects of a headshot will be considered but there is a great deal of importance in what lies underneath, a good headshot will give us an opportunity to see that too. If you’re not sure what that means or unsure as to who you, the actor, are then it’s probably time you sat down and write it down.  A great exercise is to sit down and write down your best qualities as an actor, your parts of your personality that you want to associate with what you do and then ask your friends to do the same for you. This is your list of things you need from your headshot.

As an absolute minimum, your headshot should look like you if you were to walk into an audition you should be easily recognisable – have I mentioned this before? – most likely, it’s incredibly important! Avoid getting your haircut the day before, keep make up natural or wear none at all. Glamour has no place in your portfolio unless you have a separate modelling portfolio.

4. What makes a bad headshot?

Think about the absolute worst scenario, you submit your headshot to a casting, get accepted, travel all the way down to London only to be turned away because you look nothing like your headshot. That is pretty much the main thing that makes a headshot ‘bad’.

It can go horribly wrong elsewhere too, logos, crazy fabrics, plunging necklines, distracting jewellery, backgrounds that take over the photo (like trees growing out of the back of your head) and far too much make-up.

The last thing you want a casting director or prospective agent to be thinking is, “what is this person wearing?” or “who on earth took this photo?”. If they are thinking that, they aren’t thinking of casting you or putting you on your books.

5. Be prepared – what to know before getting your headshots taken.

You’ve invested both time and money into getting your headshots done, it’s important that you should be clear on what you want to get from your headshot session.

Preparing for your headshots isn’t just about getting a haircut and getting plenty of sleep, it also requires a great deal of thought as well. What will you use your headshots for? Which type will you play? What do you aspire to?

You should be able to answer all of these questions already, take inspiration from the styles of shows you’ve seen on Netflix. If you seem to be drawn to one particular style you should ensure that your headshots fit that tone.

You should also be thinking about the types of roles you wish to play also. The clothing choices you make should compliment the look and feel of those roles you aspire to.

Preparing for your headshots isn’t just about getting a haircut and getting plenty of sleep, it also requires a great deal of thought as well.

6. What should I wear to my headshot session?

Keep it simple, non-distracting and comfortable.

The focus of your headshot should be you, not your clothes. To avoid crazy patterns and large, distracting jewellery. Bright primary colours are best: reds, blues, greens, yellows – any solid colour. Look at your own wardrobe, what looks best on you, compliments your skin tone etc. Long gone are the days of mono headshots, avoid white (which can make you look washed out) and black which just absorbs too much light.

Think about the types of characters you want to play, what would they wear. It’s useful to have outfits with multiple layers to give you a great range of options on the day. Finally, avoid anything that’s too revealing, some flesh is acceptable but nothing that will distract and take us away from looking at your face.

7. What questions should I ask a headshot photographer?

These are the best questions to ask a headshot photographer:

Do you have a portfolio of your past work?
What are your rates?
What is included in your rate?
Do you shoot indoor or outdoor?
How many looks does your session include?
How long is a session?
Do you recommend anyone for makeup, hair, retouching?

8. What can I expect from a headshot photoshoot?

Headshot photoshoots last at least one hour and can go up to three hours.

You should bring all your wardrobe changes with you, and keep makeup and a small mirror handy for touch-ups (unless you have a makeup artist on hand). If you’re shooting outdoors, wear comfortable shoes, especially if you will be walking to different locations—your feet won’t show up in the shot. Your photographer will shoot you from various different angles.

You should expect your photographer to sit you down and go through what you’ve discussed prior to the shoot. This should help keep things fresh and help you relax before the shooting begins!

9. How can I relax during my headshot session?

This is where having a great rapport with your photographer is really important.

Being able to engage easily with the person taking your photograph will help you relax. Some photographers will even direct you.

It can be overwhelming having built up how important getting this headshot right is, but that shouldn’t make you feel nervous. The key to a great headshot is being relaxed, have fun! Let your personality shine through.

The key to a great headshot is being relaxed, have fun! Let your personality shine through.

10. How often should I get new headshots taken?

You should get new headshots taken every one or two years, every 6 months to one year for children.

Any time you change your look, you need new headshots. If you get a considerable hair cut, dye it a different colour, or if you gain/lose a significant amount of weight, you should also get new headshots.

Are your current headshots benefiting or hurting your career. Are you getting positive feedback on them? Or are you getting called in less because your headshot doesn’t look like you?

11. How do I pick the right headshot?

To pick the right headshot, ask your family, friends and other actors, for advice.

Your photographer should send you a link to an online gallery of your images from your shoot. Ask people to take a look through the gallery and pick their favourites. Ask them to give you feedback on the styles or roles you come across as in them, how does this compare to that list you thought of prior to your shoot?

It can be a difficult thing, looking at row upon row of images of yourself but keep a clear mind and focus on the importance of this headshot and what it will do for you over the coming months.

Anthony is best known as a leading headshot and portrait photographer, working primarily with actors & businesses across the UK.

He’s a blogger, speaker, coach and advisor

Want some quick advice?

I regularly schedule calls to answer your questions, it all starts with a quick message from you.

What sets Anthony apart is that he really takes the time to understand exactly who you are as a performer, both by having a discussion before the shoot and constantly during the session.

Lucy Ivison

4 Ways to save money as an Actor

4 ways to save Money as an Actor

Anthony Farrimond

Becoming successful in any industry has always relied on the ability of the individual.  Raw talent, skills and a little luck will help you get the role you desire, however with growing competition for a limited number of places, those things might not get you all the way alone.

There is pressure from the industry and from peers to invest money in both developing skills as well as promoting work.  So attending workshops, masterclasses, recording voice reels, showreels and updating your actor’s headshots are necessary in order to keep yourself current. So we’ve put together our top 5 ways to save money as an actor, if you have any other suggestions, leave them in the comments section below the article!

1. Immerse yourself in culture without spending a fortune

Going to see every single performance your friends are in, or see the latest production or film out by your favourite director can become incredibly expensive.  This will seem like common sense but check to see if there is a reduced rate for matinee performances or an offer on certain days of the week at the cinema.  It might not save you mega bucks but over the space of a year the savings will add up.

2. Use your student status

Something else that theatres and cinemas will likely accept is your student ID or Union card.  A valid Student ID card can save you a considerable amount of money on the high street but also ask industry related businesses if they have offers or discounts available to full-time students. For example, I currently offer 20% off the standard price of our actor’s headshot packages to full-time students.

3. Know your tax exemptions

When it’s time to submit your self-assessment, understanding what you can claim tax back is really important.  A great deal of what you do during your day will be working towards full-time employment, honing skills, working out, networking the list goes on. There is an extensive list of things you can claim back on such as clothing (performance wear or costume), play texts, books, travel to and from auditions/acting work, computer, laptop, headshots. If you are unsure about any tax issues or deductible percentages then speak to your tax accountant, HM Revenue & Customs self-assessment department, Spotlight or Equity.

4. Kill two birds with one stone

As you start your journey in the industry you’ll need to update your headshots, put a voice reel and a showreel together.  This can be an expensive exercise with individuals spending on average £700-£1,000

Try looking for someone who can provide those combined services and who offers good value for your money but without risking quality.  If in doubt always look for people who specialise, for example, if you need to record your showreel, look for someone who supplies material, recording and editing services. However, if you already have your material for your showreel, you could employ the services of someone who offers showreel and headshot packages.

I also offer a combined option with all of our headshot packages to include the editing of your pre-recorded material for your showreel.

Anthony is best known as a leading headshot and portrait photographer, working primarily with actors & businesses across the UK.

He’s a blogger, speaker, coach and advisor

Want some quick advice?

I regularly schedule calls to answer your questions, it all starts with a quick message from you.

What sets Anthony apart is that he really takes the time to understand exactly who you are as a performer, both by having a discussion before the shoot and constantly during the session.

Lucy Ivison

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